Key drivers of profitability and competitiveness in supply chain

Since the recession began, supply chain management has been back on the agenda of companies’ boardroom. There is no doubt that it’s the perfect time for company leaders to exam their supply chain model, supply chain network and identify the hidden costs in the chain. By reshaping the supply chain strategy of companies, the supply chain can become the “cash” chain.
The below chart represents key drivers of profitability and competitiveness in the supply chain. There are three aspects that supply chain can do to drive “cash”: reduce expense, increase revenue, and improve assets liquidity. Companies should look into all aspects, encourage innovation and risk taking. Companies can not only streamline the processes to achieve a lean and efficient organization, but also make their supply chain organization into a revenue stream.

Profibility
Supply chain as cost drivers

This is the first thing that every company will jump into. “Cutting costs” becomes the slogan of the company. Many companies assign certain dollar amount to each individual as performance objectives. There is nothing wrong with that, except company leaders need to be aware of the existence of functional silos, and commit to transparency communication within the organization. As we all know, there are many tradeoff decisions to be made within supply chain, such as the traditional tradeoff between warehouse and transportation. Remember, pressure can increase the political level inside the organization and sometimes force people to make a decision based on making their numbers. High level leaders are responsible for the big picture of the whole supply chain and support the least total cost decisions for the organization. Unreasonable measurements or targets can discourage employee morale, damage organizational heath and sometimes lose supply chain talents for future growth.

Below is analysis for key drivers for supply chain as expenses and opportunities for cost reduction:
a. Transportation
There are many areas to be looked at in transportation to achieve cost savings. It has been discussed in detail in my article “Five Ways to Achieve Cost Savings in Transportation”.

b. Inventory carrying costs
It’s an area that many companies overlook and don’t even calculate and understand their inventory carrying costs. As standard rule of thumb, inventory carrying cost is 25% of inventory value on hand. When high inventory level is unavoidable during a recession, it’s a great opportunity for the company to look into their inventory carrying costs to identify opportunities. Below charts present all components for inventory carrying costs. I will discuss more into details in a separate article.

Inventory carrying cost

c. Variable production and warehousing cost
Variable costs are cost of labor, material or overhead that changes according to the change in the volume of production units. I believe many companies conduct ABC (Activity Based Costing) analysis to find out standard variable cost. Variable cost reduction can be done through process improvements to reduce wastes in production and warehouses, such as waiting time, movements, etc.

d. Raw materials
Raw material is considered as part of inventory. It includes direct and indirect raw materials. Collaboration and partnering with suppliers can lead to total inventory reduction in the chain to achieve a win-win situation, such as VMI or ERP. Scrutinizing suppliers in a difficult time will jeopardize companies in the long term.

Supply chain as revenue driver

Many companies recognize their supply chain as cost driver, but fail to see the prospect of supply chain as a critical role to drive revenue.
a. Supply chain service
Supply chain service level directly impacts customer satisfaction. Order fulfillment and on-time delivery are two major service metrics to measure company supply chain efficiency and effectiveness. Higher service levels bring higher customer satisfaction which prevents loss of revenue and leads to future sales. It’s worth noting that there is an exponential relationship between service level and cost. However, there is normally a predefined service level agreement between companies and their customers or trade partners.

b. Supply chain solutions
When business development is trying to break into a new sales channel, supply chain supporting capacity can often be brought up as a question. Example: A company wants to enter into a new market which can only order small LTL orders, but at much higher frequency. If the company has become accustomed to TL orders all the time, those LTL orders will become a market entry barrier due to increased logistics cost. Under this kind of circumstance, supply chain, as its supporting role to revenue increase, needs to be flexible and innovative to provide a solution as an enabler for market expansion without hurting the company’s bottom line. In this case, working with 3PL for LTL consolidation can often be the solution for the challenge.

c. Recycling or reverse logistics.
It’s one area that is easily neglected by many companies. Recycling, picking up disposed goods from the customers and reselling, can not only improve customer satisfaction and lead to new purchase, but also bring the company a new channel of revenue by reselling disposable goods to a safe recycling channel. It also helps companies to fulfill their social commitment for environment sustainability.

Supply chain as assets management

Asset management can be the most challenging task for supply chain because it would take a much longer time to make changes in company assets, such as leasing contracts for warehouses. Better asset management in supply chain will require will require organization transparency and a communication from upstream to downstream to minimize functional silo.

a. Fixed cost of DCs and docks
For a company with excess inventory, it’s costly to acquire more space for storage. For companies with extra space due to less demand, it won’t be easy to close DC in the short term and there is also a risk for a higher acquiring cost when the market is back. So companies can seek partner opportunities with each other to overcome the difficult time together. A project I worked on in the past is to provide a customer storage solution. With certain incentives, the customers purchase several months of inventory shipped directly from the manufacturer. They utilize their empty spaces to make storage revenue and the products are used for their future demand. While the company with excess can avoid the cost of new warehouse space and one leg of transportation from storage to the customers. Certainly this kind of process needs to be carefully managed to avoid skewing demand and other possible negative impact.

b. Fixed cost of plant
This is the most difficult part of all costs reduction opportunities because it may lead to the close of a factory or downsizing the workforce. It’s the last thing I like to see and propose because I’m also one of the millions who lost their job during the recession. The company should try their best to use other methods such as work sharing or payroll reduction to work with employees to overcome the difficult time together. However, as a business person, I can also understand “competitive advantage”. If closing a plant is the best thing for long term growth and efficiency, we just need to face the reality and move on.

c. Cost of private fleet
It’s very similar to the fixed cost of DCs and docks. When it’s not possible to reduce the size of the private fleet in the short term, partner with suppliers or customers to share the capacity to reduce costs.

d. Inventory management
Inventory is the biggest issue to any company during a recession when consumption drops dramatically. It’s a big topic and there are many things that can be done in inventory management. It not only requires day-to-day tactical inventory management to minimize inventory DOS and maintain a targeted customer service level, but also requires some strategic decisions from higher levels to achieve inventory goals.
I. Use demand driven forecast, instead of sales & marketing driven. Many companies include their marketing goal in their demand forecast which produces an inflated the demand forecast. Inventory overflow is unavoidable when the market is down. Face the reality, and forecast based on customer demand.
II. Centralize inventory management, instead of decentralize. A decentralized ordering or inventory management can normally cause higher inventory in the entire supply chain. Centralized inventory management will lead to better forecasting at an aggregate level and hence result in a lower inventory.
III. Inventory optimization and classification. ABC classification can improve inventory turn while maintaining fulfillment service levels. Optimization will lead to SKU reduction so companies can focus on their critical products for better service and lower cost.

Established metrics leads to total supply chain excellence

Besides all of these actions and factors to enable supply chain to become the “cash” chain, leaders should not forget to establish well-designed metrics for the entire organization to achieve total supply chain profitability and competiveness. Company leaders need to be aware that high costs in some areas are normally the symptoms of root causes, and many times, those problems are caused by the wrong metrics in the organization. Requesting cost savings without removing the root causes and establishing accurate performance metrics, the cost savings initiatives can be a failure. For example, production cost per unit is a great measurement of manufacturing efficiency, but it can result in high inventory when manufacturing ignores other cost components in supply chain and over produces in order to reduce cost per unit to meet their metric. This kind of story actually happens every day, and it’s a daily battle for many supply chain professionals. The right metrics convey the right positive incentives and drive the right decisions. When overhauls in supply chain need to be done at a strategic level to achieve day-to-day tactical operational efficiency, company leaders have the obligation and responsibility to face reality and to make the right strategic decisions for the organization.

Bookmark and Share

When “Green” encounters “Efficiency”- What supply chain executives can do to achieve both

I enjoy reading the article Can You Have a Lean-Green-Global Supply Chain by Mollenkopf, Tate and Ecklund. It explains the possible conflict and synergy between lean and green supply chain. At least it gives me a very clear definition of “sustainability”, which I often misused as well.

Like the authors say, “green” or “sustainability” are buzz words for today’s business environment. To be green means to avoid negative impact to the environment, including air, land and water, and sometime even creating positive impact. But when “green” encounters “efficiency”, companies often choose “efficiency” over “green”. In the end, executives need to be responsible to the stockholders for company bottom line. Going “green” becomes something nice to have as part of a company’s social commitment. I had personal experience that a famous warehouse club resists to optimize truck in order to keep their dock loading efficiency. But actually, many components in supply chain can provide companies with “green” opportunities and at the same time help companies achieve cost and efficiency objectives. Below are some of my thoughts:

  1. Use “green” material for product design and packaging. Companies can choose to use green materials which can be recycled and reused, which will not impact the environment negatively. Using recycled pallets is a good example in packaging. It’s more challenging to substitute direct materials of the products. However with the green initiatives from governments, there is more and more R&D invested in developing “green” materials. That is true that green substitutes can be more expensive today. However, working with suppliers closely in product development and increasing the economic scale of the material can optimally reduce the material cost and achieve “green” prospective.
  2. Reduce unnecessary movements in operation and logistics. It’s back to Lean concept to reduce waste of movements. In a factory or warehouse, layout improvement can eliminate unnecessary travel of the workers and forklift trucks, and improve efficiency. Postponing inventory deployment can ship the products to the right locations to meet customers demand, thus avoiding possible stock transfer movements among different regions. For unavoidable small batch or LTL orders from the customers, the efficiency can be achieved through LTL consolidations. All of those reduced movements will not only save significant transportation cost, but also resulting CO2 omission reduction and contribute to a greener environment.
  3. Improve reverse logistics. Reverse logistics hasn’t been paid too much attention by many companies. But how to reuse, return or dispose of the defective products will have a huge impact on both “green” and logistics costs savings. Companies need to re-examine their reverse chain for more value creation. For examples, instead of shipping the consumers returned products directly to the overseas or local suppliers for inspection and repair, the company can source local service providers to sort the returned products, resell the nondirective ones and then send the defective ones to repair, locally if possible. There is additional service fee incurred, but the savings from unnecessary shipping is tremendous. Just thinking about it, most of returned products from the consumers are actually not defective products. When disposal or scrape is avoidable for end-of-life products, the company should be socially responsible to make sure the wastes are properly handled by the recycling service provider. The goal is to create zero landfill. And keep in mind, any hazardous disposal will damage the company’s reputation and cost more for damage recovery.

Going green is not just a slogan. Going green in supply chain can help a company achieve cost savings or cost avoidance. Executives need to commit to support green initiatives and engage their employees to identify any green opportunities inside and outside the company. As the article says, companies embracing green, lean and global supply chain strategies may in fact continue to gain momentum and find themselves poised on the leading edge of competitiveness.

Bookmark and Share